Max Frost is currently number 1 on the Pop Tones charts with his tune White Lines. We were pleased to learn that Max, until recently, was a student at the University of Texas in Austin where our niece attends college: Go Longhorns!

guitarbage:

Johnny Winter Z”L

You will be missed.

RIP Johnny

The theme of this mix is WATER

Grey Season

We recently discovered Grey Season playing at a friends house party. Our friend had donated “above and beyond” to the groups Kickstarter campaign to make the self titled record they’ve just released. They were all rightfully proud to tell us how it was recorded in Levon Helm's studio barn.

The members of Grey Seaon all spent time at the Berklee School of Music and it was telling that they sounded like seasoned veterans even though they’re all in their very early 20’s. They didn’t use a PA system which struck us as weird until we heard them sing; all five of them sing together.

Then Matt Knelman the lead guitarist, told me that they got started playing on street corners and that they’ll still do that from time to time.

They basically had their street gear at the party: tiny drum kit and bass amp and acoustic guitars, banjos and mandolins and playing at lower decibels so the vocals could be heard. 

Their lyrics are very earnest and sometimes morbid in the way young lovers can be. Satellite sounds like the hit of the record. It’s got a chorus that jumps out at full scope in a contemporary, radio-friendly way. Another stand out is their cover of Bob Dylan’s "Mama, You’ve Been on My Mind" with an acapella introduction. 

At the core of the sound, is the voices of Jon Mills and Chris “Gooch” Bloniarz who also plays the banjo and mandolin. They harmonize on most songs and, indeed, this pairing was the nucleus around the formation of Grey Season.

The group is rounded out by the lanky Ian Jones who peppers bis phrases with f-bombs but can rip on bass and reminds me of Pete Erchick, our old roommate and stellar musician with The Olivia Tremor Control, and Ben Burns who could play in most any band as a singer, guitarist and banjo player, much less what he does here on drums. 

We see big things on the horizon for Grey Season. Besides the fact that they 
don’t like the comparison to Mumford & Sons, Grey Season should benefit from recent groups that like them who harken back to “Americana” stylings. 

(When we spoke to them we couldn’t believe they hadn’t heard "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" by the Byrds. They’re folk but not so much country. Yet we’d love to hear them cover one of those tunes such as "You Don’t Miss Your Water." 

Grey Season hails from Boston but are traveling around New England and New York and most likely further and further out as the word spreads. Check out Satelites:
Grey Season
We recently discovered Grey Season playing at a friends house party. Our friend had donated “above and beyond” to the groups Kickstarter campaign to make the self titled record they’ve just released. They were all rightfully proud to tell us how it was recorded in Levon Helm's studio barn.
The members of Grey Seaon all spent time at the Berklee School of Music and it was telling that they sounded like seasoned veterans even though they’re all in their very early 20’s. They didn’t use a PA system which struck us as weird until we heard them sing; all five of them sing together.
Then Matt Knelman the lead guitarist, told me that they got started playing on street corners and that they’ll still do that from time to time.
They basically had their street gear at the party: tiny drum kit and bass amp and acoustic guitars, banjos and mandolins and playing at lower decibels so the vocals could be heard. 
Their lyrics are very earnest and sometimes morbid in the way young lovers can be. Satellite sounds like the hit of the record. It’s got a chorus that jumps out at full scope in a contemporary, radio-friendly way. Another stand out is their cover of Bob Dylan’s "Mama, You’ve Been on My Mind" with an acapella introduction. 
At the core of the sound, is the voices of Jon Mills and Chris “Gooch” Bloniarz who also plays the banjo and mandolin. They harmonize on most songs and, indeed, this pairing was the nucleus around the formation of Grey Season.
The group is rounded out by the lanky Ian Jones who peppers bis phrases with f-bombs but can rip on bass and reminds me of Pete Erchick, our old roommate and stellar musician with The Olivia Tremor Control, and Ben Burns who could play in most any band as a singer, guitarist and banjo player, much less what he does here on drums. 
We see big things on the horizon for Grey Season. Besides the fact that they 
don’t like the comparison to Mumford & Sons, Grey Season should benefit from recent groups that like them who harken back to “Americana” stylings. 
(When we spoke to them we couldn’t believe they hadn’t heard "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" by the Byrds. They’re folk but not so much country. Yet we’d love to hear them cover one of those tunes such as "You Don’t Miss Your Water." 
Grey Season hails from Boston but are traveling around New England and New York and most likely further and further out as the word spreads. Check out Satelites:
cretin-family:

The Ramones and Iggy Pop with Seymour and Linda Stein at CBGB Photo by Roberta Bayley

Iggy would have been good on Sire Records

cretin-family:

The Ramones and Iggy Pop with Seymour and Linda Stein at CBGB Photo by Roberta Bayley

Iggy would have been good on Sire Records

Gary P Nunn & Jerry Jeff Walker - London Homesick Blues - We had a visit in London something like what is depicted in this song which was recommended to us by our father after hearing about our woes from the trip. We went out and learned it straight away.

snaggle-teeth:

When you sit down to draw the Cramps and try to decided which crazy outfit to draw them in…you end up drawing four and making a stupid gif.

snaggle-teeth:

When you sit down to draw the Cramps and try to decided which crazy outfit to draw them in…you end up drawing four and making a stupid gif.

After reading his interview in Rolling Stone, it’s apparent that Jack White compares himself and the White Stripes to the Black Keys. He seems annoyed at their success and was bummed to have his kids in the same school as (?’s). He can’t help feeling the Black Keys are working from the White Stripes playbook. 

White also clearly misses the special chemistry he had with his old drummer Meg. The Black Keys are still in tact and making great music year after year and he might be jealous of their ability to keep it together.

White is also producing year after year but, with the new album Lazaretto, there’s a sense that he’s straining himself to equal what the White Stripes did in the past. It’s the same struggle all great artists have to grapple with: competing with one’s past work. The White Stripes earlier work is free of this requirement and therefore doesn’t have to live up to a pre-defined image. That’s how songs like “We’re Going to be Friends" get written and produced.We can’t imagine that song on Lazeretto, it’s too carefree and unconscious of being a "cool Jack White song." It’s detached and on it’s own in the world. You can imagine many other singers covering it. Indeed it works as a song by itself in it’s playful simplicity. A song any kid could sing.

The songs on Lazaretto seem firmly entrenched with White’s new Sweeney Todd look. The new feature is violen and female vocals on a number of songs but there’s nothing here nearly as memorable as 7 Nation Army or Icky Thump. Some songs left us scratching out heads. What is he getting at with the song “Entitlement?” We can’t tell if he wants more folks to be entitled or if there are too many folks feeling entitled. Is he a Fox News fan now?

The title song may be the best on the album. It’s the closest White’s come to rapping. While he will always compete strongly with sounds and a strong visual, over the top personality, maybe, deep down, Jack White resents the Black Keys simply because, at this point, they are writing better songs.

We heard So it Goes and thought Nick Lowe had a hot new single out. Then we find out that the song is not only not new but is, in fact, one of his first and oldest releases. Indeed it was the very first release of the legendary Stiff Records label.

Lowe is still out there making music. He’s got a Christmas record coming out this year. We’ll be checking that out when the time comes.